Think long-term and execute the ideas practically

Fokspaper creative content is shared and protected through blockchain

Please introduce yourself and your startup Folkspaper to our readers!

Based in Boston, I am the CEO and Founder of Folkspaper. I hold a bachelor’s degree from Hanover University of Music, Drama, and Media in Germany and received an A.D. from Yale University. I grew up in Taiwan and has always loved classical music, and moved to Germany to attend university and then to Boston in 2011 to experience life on the other side of the Atlantic. My goal was always to share my love of classical music with others, which has since expanded to sharing creative content for the world through Folkspaper’s social journalism platform. Prior to founding Folkspaper, I founded a music production house in Boston called Goldstones Studios.

I oversaw the video game orchestra and produced music for games such as the Final Fantasy series and Kingdom Hearts. During my music career, I was the music director and chief conductor for “Assassin’s Creed: Symphony World Tour”, the original pianist to record the soundtrack for Final Fantasy XV and a concert pianist for “Kingdom Hearts World Tour” and “Legend of Zelda World Tour”. I still tour with the Assassin’s Creed Symphony world tour.

How did you get the idea of Folkspaper?

While I was working and living in Boston producing music for video games, my goal was always to share music with others and this brought me to the idea to create a forum where classical musicians could exchange information with one another. This was where the idea for Folkspaper originated.

The more I divulged into this, the more I realized that classical music was a very niche field. I decided that in order to make the forum more relevant and engaging for everyone, I needed to include a wide range of music in the forum. This idea kept growing and more topics were added to the forum. Hence, Folkspaper was born.

Why did you decide to start with Folkspaper?

I believe that technology is a great tool to influencing our day-to-day life, especially when the Internet has been taking over the majority of our time. While the hardware (smartphones), and the software (social media) are introduced to us in this century, it is important that we keep improving and innovating what it takes to us the next. And Folkspaper should be part of it, including rewarding content contributors and protecting their digital assets.

What is the vision behind Folkspaper?

The long term mission for Folkspaper is to establish a reputation within the content creation community. Folkspaper aims to be a platform where the content shared is protected through blockchain technology, and acts as space where aspiring journalists and creators can come to produce original and creative content while being compensated by their community. As traditional forms of journalism continue to fade, Folkspaper hopes to replace it with community-driven journalism that allows the community to compensate content creators for contributing to the Folkspaper platform. We hope to eventually be known as the go-to space for the most recent and up to date news from around the world.

How difficult was the start and which challenges you had to overcome?

Our biggest challenge came early on in finding a programmer. As a classical musician, I had no idea where to begin looking for an advanced programmer in order to help make Folkspaper a reality. I began asking around my group of friends, but as most of my friends were also musicians the chances of finding someone was looking slim. After several months of not succeeding and thinking that it might be time to give up, one of my friends mentioned she might know someone who might be interested, who at the time was working at Twitter as an Engineer. That person was Alex Wu.

Who is your target audience?

As Folkspaper offers a feature to reward content contributors through cryptocurrencies, it is the first priority that the community of blockchain, including Bitcoin holders, is aware of this new platform. The trend of cryptocurrencies has been going along with some headline news for quite a while and there are many things that we can make it good again by providing a much more professional service.

What is the USP of your startup?

The team of Folkspaper consists of some great talents. The CTO, Alex, who previously worked at Twitter has joined the Folkspaper team and helped build a solid product along with Musasi, the Product Designer, whose previous project had attracted 700 million users per month. In addition, with my unique strategy in engaging the community through music and video gaming projects, the Folkspaper team aims for taking the ideas of crowdsourcing to the next level.

Can you describe your typical workday?

After the angel financing round, the company has not stopped growing since then. The Folkspaper team has moved out of my small apartment to co-working spaces downtown Boston and has changed to larger working spaces several times in order to fit the growing team. The team is enthusiastic about coming to the office every morning. Every day, they discuss the strategy of improving the product and how it is to be delivered to prospective users. The team executes ideas practically and very efficiently and fixes mistakes as soon as they are spotted. It is as though an enormous engine running and they are inspired to accelerating the flow of transforming the company from a startup to a professional business entity.

Where do you see yourself and your startup Folkspaper in five years?

A lot of things could happen in five years. Folkspaper aims to become one of the major go-to platforms not only for cryptocurrency holders but also for average users. The team believes that there is a bright future in blockchain and cryptocurrency when a great product is introduced to the public.

What 3 tips would you give to other founders?

Be crystal clear about what you do and believe in it. Be persistent yet absorb everything that comes your way and transforms yourself into a better entrepreneur. Think long-term and execute the ideas practically.

More information you will find here

Thank you Ivan Linn for the Interview

Statements of the author and the interviewee do not necessarily represent the editors and the publisher opinion again.

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